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Cheap Moving Companies Baltimore MD

 

Finding an affordable mover in Baltimore isn’t too tricky if you have a solid game plan. Just like any big life decision, moving takes some planning and research. Now that you have figured out your destination, getting there should be the easy part.

How do I find an affordable mover in Baltimore?

If you want to save some money on your move, you should consider doing some of the work yourself. Not the heavy lifting—leave the physical labor to the affordable moving professionals. But there are some things you can do in advance of the move to save money and make the packing and settling easier. Let’s face it; most of us don’t like to throw things away. Half of Americans admit they have a little bit of a problem with clutter, and forty percent confess to quite a bit. We might not take this to the extreme of those “hoarder” television shows, but we hold on to things that should be thrown out or donated to charity. Often, we keep things with the idea that we might need them in the future, or just for sentimental reasons. We store them in our bedroom closets or the garage.

The best way to prepare for a less expensive move is to reduce the amount of unnecessary stuff that gets moved. The cost of any move depends on how much you are moving and how far you are moving it. If you reduce the amount, the job will cost less. Plus, you get to enjoy the opportunity to start fresh in your new home with a simple, uncluttered look that is much easier to keep tidy. Start by sorting through the stored items in the garage or closets. Be firm with yourself—if you haven’t worn it in a few months, donate it to a charity (get a receipt, you might be entitled to a tax deduction). Or have a virtual garage sale and see if other people want to but the things you no longer use. There are various online sales apps to facilitate your ability to reduce your storage while increasing someone else’s.

Here are the top ten items that Americans like to save that you should get rid of before you pack for a move:

  • Old clothing
  • Old shoes and boots
  • Seasonal décor
  • Books
  • Boxes (you will need these)
  • New clothing never worn
  • Used chargers and cables
  • Old magazines and newspapers (use the newspapers for packing)
  • Old movies
  • Obsolete electronics

If you live in an area with good community recycling, look for an e-waste event to dispose of the old electronic components, rather than sending them to a landfill. The same goes for the used chargers and cords. Anything that you can’t sell, you can donate to your choice of philanthropic organization. Some will pick up your items at home, but others may ask you to drop them off.

Next, you can do most of the packing yourself. A moving company will provide you with a bid for packing everything if you ask, but this is work you can do on your own, and take your time as you prepare for the move. Use common sense—don’t start with the things you will need to use frequently; start with the stuff you can do without for a couple of weeks. If you are moving in winter, pack the summer clothes and toys, and garage items first.  One thing to remember about packing is that the boxes should be full but not too heavy. Also, when you discuss insurance (valuation) with your mover, they will remind you that how you pack the contents matters. Items you pack are not protected by insurance if they drop the box, but the box isn’t damaged. So, put some packing material on the bottom, and then a few of the heavier items. Next, put some lighter things, then more packing material. You don’t want empty spaces because that allows too much motion. Pro tip: Don’t get too many of the extra-large boxes, because they will be heavy. Books should go in smaller packages. Dishes should go in smaller containers, and you need to wrap them carefully. You can use linens and clothing instead of packing paper for dishes.

How do I compare the movers’ estimates for the best deal?

Ask at least three moving companies to come to your home and estimate the job. They will walk through the residence with you and look at everything that you need to move. You can point out things that you plan to give away or sell so that they can exclude those items from the inventory. Let them know if you have a storage unit with additional items to pick up or anything else that will increase or decrease the job’s size. Ask them to submit a written estimate of the cost to you. If this is a local move (less than 100 miles), the mover will give you a price based on how much time they need to do the work. If you are moving long-distance, the estimate will depend on how much your goods weigh and how far you are moving.

Estimates can be binding or nonbinding. A binding estimate is a guaranteed price, and customers often prefer this approach since you don’t have to worry about paying more when they finish the work. Double-check to be sure that you are not comparing binding to nonbinding when you compare estimates—the vendor offering a binding estimate might be adding in a little wiggle room. In contrast, the nonbinding estimate might look lower to start but end up higher. Don’t hesitate to ask why one is different, especially if the weight assessment is sharply higher or lower.

If an estimate seems “too good to be true,” it might be a moving scam. Some shady operators will take advantage of your interest in saving money and offer you a cut-rate price. They might tell you they just happen to have an opening on the day you need to move, or it’s a special in your neighborhood or some other phony reason. Unfortunately, they might be planning to defraud you. If the mover asks for a substantial deposit before the move, be suspicious. Most moving services are paid for when the delivery is made, not before. They may take your good-faith deposit and disappear. Or the company may send a crew that starts loading your goods and then tells you that the estimate was wrong and insists that you agree to a new, much higher price to continue.

One way to reduce the chance of being a victim of this type of scam is to check out the company’s reputation and references before you hire them. The Better Business Bureau collects positive and negative reviews about moving companies on its website. If the mover conducts any interstate work, you can also check it on FMCSA, the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration. Ask your top choice for some recent customers and call to talk to them about their experience with the mover. You should be able to reach some recent clients and get an honest appraisal of their performance.

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